Saturday, December 31, 2016

Thank You

Blogging has been one interesting journey for me and I truly enjoyed this creative experience. It has been nearly 5 years since I started typing out my recipes along with some very talented guest bloggers--resulting in nearly 500 posts. As with many fun activities, there is an end and so for now, it's time for me to retire from blogging. I am glad that I took a chance and blindly leapt into this project with little information on blogging. I believe that sometimes what you read can deter you from doing some things. As with all things in my life I hope that I have improved since my initial post. The most important accomplishment is that I have achieved a few personal goals that I set for myself back in 2012:

1) To document for the first time recipes and ideas not only from my own imagination and memories of food that I ate but also some from my own family. Almost all of my family's recipes came from word of mouth...and as many of you have read often quite vague! I know of only one recipe that was written down. In the early 1980s, my mother's egg roll recipe was published in our community church cookbook.

2) To improve my writing skills...mainly to write in complete sentences. Writing is a huge struggle for me and it is still a work in progress. For 2 decades I barely wrote in complete sentences or in paragraphs. In nursing (as a Registered Nurse and as a Family Nurse Practitioner) one does not write a lengthy story. If you write too much on your patients no one will have the time or interest to read it. We prefer short, simple and to the point!

3) To improve my photography skills...which is also a work in progress. There is always room for improvement and every day I strive to gain new skills and be better. And as with food, I find that photography brings people closer together.

4) To involve some of my friends and family/relatives as guest writers/bloggers so they can share their delicious recipes, great ideas or stories. I want to thank my family and friends who have contributed to my blog: my grandparents, my parents, my father-in-law, aunts, cousins, and friends.

I also want to thank all of my blog members for your support. Thank you to those of you for stopping by my website to visit even if it was by accident! I am constantly in awe to see viewers from all over the world...even some countries I have not yet visited. I know for a fact that some of my members are not scared of my blog or are horrified by what I wrote/cooked/ate. I sincerely thank you for sticking around! I also want to thank my husband Paul for his endless support and constant encouragement, putting up with my hobbies, helping me do the dishes/cleaning the mess I made in the kitchen, eating everything I make without questioning and always appearing to enjoy every bite! So, what's next? At the moment I will try to keep this blog up passively. Instead of writing my own recipes I may continue to have guest bloggers in the future...of course if I can locate them! For any members who have any interest in sharing your recipes, ideas or food stories please let me know. I would love to have you be a part of my food journey!

--photo taken with my husband Paul on Maui, 2016--
Again thank you for following my blog and I hope you get to play with your ingredients often! May you stay happy, healthy, safe, surrounding yourself with good company and good food! Happy New Year from Thanh's Kitchen to yours!                   

Thanh Thai
thanhskitchen.com
thanhskitchen@gmail.com

--photo taken in NH in 2015--

Four Berry Sauce

Four Berry Sauce with strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries
berry sauce with strawberries and raspberries
You can make this quick and easy Four Berry Sauce using any type of fresh berries. I prefer using a combination of different types of berries for colors, texture, and taste. Recently I helped my neighbor Inge make some using strawberries and blackberries to drizzle over a plain cheesecake. While visiting my in-laws over Christmas I made a sauce using strawberries and raspberries to drizzle over pancakes and ice cream. This recipe is a sauce made with multiple berries, especially for my husband to eat with plain yogurt for breakfast. You can adjust the amount of additional sugar based on how sweet the berries are already and your personal preference. This sauce may be refrigerated for up to a week.

Four Berry Sauce

Ingredients:

16 oz fresh strawberries
12 oz fresh blueberries
6 oz fresh blackberries
6 oz fresh raspberries
About 1/3 cup sugar
Cornstarch-Water Mixture (thickener): about 1 Tbsp of cornstarch and 1 Tbsp of water--mix well, optional

Method:

In a medium sized pot cook the strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and sugar in medium heat until the sugar dissolves and the berries are mildly soft (about 5-6 minutes). Add raspberries and cornstarch-water mixture to thicken the sauce. Stir and turn off heat. Keep the pot on the stove to cook further.

*I used 100% natural turbinado cane sugar in this recipe.


Taro Pancakes
Taro Pancakes (makes about 10-12 pancakes)

Ingredients:

1 1/4 cup whole milk
1 egg
1 cup Taro Pancake Mix
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp baking powder

Method:

Whisk the milk and egg together. Slowly whisk in all the dry ingredients. Lightly fry the pancakes in a little oil until golden brown.

*I used Hawaii's Taro Pancake mix (Taro Brand from Hawaii). The pancake mix calls for adding just water but I added a few extra ingredients.
*Add more milk if the batter is too thick and add more flour if the batter is too thin.

Four Berry Sauce over Taro Pancakes

*Addendum:
I did not like the previous pancake recipe (above) but my husband thought they were fine. This time I made another batch of 8 pancakes and they were a lot softer. I used about 1 cup of Taro Pancake Mix. Add a few large spoonfuls of plain yogurt and enough milk and whisk everything until the batter is a little thinner than honey consistency

Monday, December 26, 2016

Naghmeh's Rainbow Salad (serves about 2)

Naghmeh's Rainbow Salad
Naghmeh tells me she makes a salad by chopping up vegetables to eat along with Alex's Chicken Moufle. Here is my version of this salad and I am going to name it after her!

Naghmeh's Rainbow Salad (serves about 2)

Ingredients:

About 1/2 small orange bell pepper, seeds removed, sliced
About 10 small tomatoes (various types and colors), halved or quartered
About 1/4 English cucumber, chopped
1/8th red onion, peeled, sliced
A few sprigs of cilantro, chopped
Juice from about 1/2 a lime
A little olive oil (about 1 tsp)
A little salt
A little white pepper

Method:

Toss everything in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

Naghmeh's Persian Salad
Naghmeh's Persian Salad consists of ingredients that she typically makes for her family. Traditionally there is no bell pepper but sometimes she adds it to this salad. Thank you Naghmeh for sharing your recipes!

Naghmeh's Persian Salad

Ingredients:

Cucumbers
Tomatoes
Onions
Lemon juice
Extra virgin olive oil
Mint
Salt
Pepper

Method:

Toss everything together, season with salt and pepper and serve immediately.

*In this salad (see photo above) I use about 3/4 English cucumber (keeping the skin on), a large handful of small variety of tomatoes, about 1/4 large red onion, juice from about half a lemon, a drizzle of olive oil, about 10 mint leaves, and season with salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste. I like to cut my vegetables in various sizes for my own visual gratification. You can chop them or cut them however you prefer. Once you make this salad serve it right away. If you leave it too long it will get watery.

Alex's Chicken Moufle (about 4-5 servings)

 
Alex's Chicken Moufle

I first met my beautiful Iranian-American friend Naghmeh several decades ago in high school Track & Field. Honestly, I could not run...maybe unless I am being chased by a bear and my life is depending on how fast my legs move! I definitely did not win any medals but at least that extra-curricular activity allowed me to stay active and made new friends. Somehow we lost touch after we graduated from college probably because both of us moved multiple times and our busy lives took us in different paths but luckily we found each other again thanks to social media. When I met her we became instant friends. She and I shared many things in common. One significant life changing event--we both left our birth countries with our parents to seek a better opportunity in the United States. I remember she told me she and her parents left family, friends, and their worldly possessions...uprooted from a comfortable and well-to-do lifestyle in Iran to live in a small rental apartment in Bangor. Although it must have been a huge life-altering adjustment for all of them, as it is for most of us who find ourselves having to resettle in a foreign country, I never once heard them complain or speak of anything negative. I know they were very happy to reunite with her sister and other relatives already here. Currently, Naghmeh resides with her beautiful family in California. Although she is a working mom she loves cooking especially Persian food for her family.

Recently Naghmeh shared with me her version of Persian lemon chicken. She cooks without measuring but she gave me her best estimation of the ingredients. She does not have a name for this dish but tells me her son Alex named it "chicken moufle" when he was just four years old! "I'm not sure why he called that. He has always made up names for things." Both of her children, Alex and Samira love this dish and when they request this dish they refer to it as "chicken moufle"!
 

She explains that many Persian dishes have turmeric and she normally uses the powder form. According to her this is not a fancy dish and does not require any herbs. She admits that adding lemon slices as a  garnish to create a prettier presentation can't hurt. "The key is the long cooking time to develop the simple but strong flavors." She serves this chicken dish with rice and Persian chopped salad.

Thank you Naghmeh for sharing this special Persian dish and to Alex for putting a name to something delicious! Below is Naghmeh's recipe.


Alex's Chicken Moufle
Alex's Chicken Moufle (about 4-5 servings)

Ingredients:

About 2 Tbsp canola oil or grape seed oil
1 large onion, peeled, cut into wedges
About 2 Tbsp turmeric powder
8-10 chicken drumsticks with skin intact
About 2 cups water (or enough to cover 1/4 way up the pan)
About 2 Tbsp lemon juice (from store bought bottle)
Salt
Pepper

Method:

Saute onion in a little canola or grape seed oil until lightly golden. Add about 2 tablespoons of turmeric powder. Turn the heat on high, arrange the chicken drums on the bottom of the pan with the onions spreading around the chicken. Let the chicken brown for about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper the chicken (I like a good amount of salt). Add about 2 cups of water (or enough to cover 1/4 way up the pan). Cover the pan and turn the heat to medium-low and let simmer for about 20 minutes. Add about 2 tablespoons of bottled lemon juice (more depth in flavor than fresh). Cover the pot or pan back up, turn the heat to low and let simmer for at least an hour. Add more water, salt and pepper if needed. Once done the chicken should fall off the bone.

*My version of Alex's Chicken Moufle is basically the same as above. I bought 9 chicken drumsticks (used "all natural" fresh young chickens) that came in a package. The chicken came to 1.19 pounds and with the total cost of $3.37 USD. Pretty cheap for good chicken! There was not much fat but I cut out some of the fatty parts of the skin and left most of the skin intact. I added the chicken drumsticks and lightly sear these first before adding the turmeric powder. Instead of water, I used 4 cups of (organic) store-bought chicken stock. I simmered everything in the pot for 20 minutes then added 3 tablespoons of lemon juice (store bought bottle), 1 teaspoon of salt and 1 teaspoons of freshly ground black pepper. Instead of covering the pot completely I partially covered it for about another 1 hour over low heat so the liquid can reduce to about half. Roughly every 20 minutes I skimmed off and discarded the impurities that floated to the top. My friend and neighbor Inge described what sounds to me she had caught an intestinal virus and had not been eating for 4 days. I invited her to join me for dinner and she surprised us both with what she could eat. She thanked me for getting her appetite back to near normal with this meal! We ate this with freshly steamed rice and Naghmeh's Rainbow Salad. Tasty!!

*Here is a WedMD link on turmeric. This has the general overview, uses, side effects, interactions and dosing (pill form) on turmeric. Before you take any herbal supplement such as turmeric pills please consult with your health care provider.  http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-662-turmeric.aspx?activeingredientid=662

*University of Maryland Medical Center also has some great information on turmeric with references of supporting research documents if you wish to review them. http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/turmeric  

Naghmeh's Rainbow Salad
Naghmeh tells me she makes a salad by chopping up vegetables to eat along with this dish. Here is my version of this salad and I am going to name it after her!

Naghmeh's Rainbow Salad (about 2 servings)

Ingredients:

About 1/2 small orange bell pepper, seeds removed, sliced
About 10 small tomatoes (various types and colors), halved or quartered
About 1/4 English cucumber, chopped
1/8th red onion, peeled, sliced
A few sprigs of cilantro, chopped
Juice from about 1/2 a lime
A little olive oil (about 1 tsp)
A little salt
A little white pepper

Method:

Toss everything in a bowl and season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

Naghmeh's Persian Salad

The salad below consists of ingredients that Naghmeh usually make for her family. Traditionally there is no bell pepper but sometimes she adds it to this salad. Thank you Naghmeh for sharing your recipes!

Naghmeh's Persian Salad

Ingredients:

Cucumbers
Tomatoes
Onions
Lemon juice
Extra virgin olive oil
Mint leaves
Salt
Pepper

Method:

Toss everything together and serve immediately.

*In this salad (see photo above) I used about 3/4 English cucumber (keeping the skin on), a large handful of small variety of tomatoes, about 1/4 large red onion, juice from about half a lemon, a few drizzles of extra-virgin olive oil, about 10 home-grown mint leaves, and seasoned with a few pinches of salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste. I like to cut my vegetables in various ways for my own visual gratification. You can chop them or cut them however you prefer. Once you make this salad serve it right away. If you leave it too long it will get watery as the salt will draw out the liquid.
*Choose cucumbers with few or small seeds. If you happen to find some with large seeds just scoop out the middle and discard. 

Saturday, December 24, 2016

Scallop & Shrimp Ceviche (appetizer for about 12-14 people)

Scallop & Shrimp Ceviche
I made this Scallop & Shrimp Ceviche to bring to a pre-Christmas party last night--hosted by our dear friend and neighbor Carlos. Yes, the same Carlos who shared with me his family tamales recipe! I was unsure how everyone (at the party) will react to eating completely raw seafood so I "cooked" the scallops in lime and lemon juice for about 3 hours. The acid caused the scallops to turn quite opaque. I also peeled and steamed the large shrimp until they were just cooked--about 5 minutes. Once the shrimp completely cooled down, I diced them, added them to the scallops and kept them refrigerated. I kept the cut up scallops and shrimp in a lemon-lime juice in one glass container and all the vegetables and herbs in another. At the party I combined everything together and seasoned with salt and hot sauce. To me the sriracha is mild in spiciness. If you want to make it with more heat then add some chopped chili peppers such as Thai chilies or habaneros. Once everything got mixed then I placed it over a larger container with lots of ice to keep the contents cold for the duration of our party. 

I did not intend to post this recipe since it was on the spur of the moment and I was rushed. However, I noticed everyone was eating the ceviche and they all seemed to enjoy it. So I ran to the bowl to get a photo. Luckily there was a little remaining.

Thank you Carlos for another fun party!

Merry Christmas!


Merry Christmas!
(photo courtesy of my husband Paul, 2016)

Scallop & Shrimp Ceviche (appetizers for about 12-14 people)


Ingredients:

About 1 1/2 lb shrimp
About 1 1/2 lb fresh local scallops, previously frozen, thawed in refrigerator and diced
Zests from 1 lime and 1 lemon
Juice from 1 lime
Juice from 1 lemon
A handful of cilantro leaves, chopped or cut with kitchen scissors
1 yellow baby bell pepper, seeds removed, diced
1 red baby bell pepper, seeds removed, diced
3/4 pint of grape tomatoes, some seeds removed, halved or quartered
1 bunch of scallions, green parts only, chopped
1/2 English cucumber, chopped
1/3 red onion, chopped
Sea salt to taste
Sriracha sauce

Method:

1) Peel the shrimp and steam for about 5 minutes or until cooked through. The shrimp will turn pink when cooked. Set aside and let the shrimp cool completely. Dice each shrimp into 4-5 pieces depending on the size of your shrimp.
2) Remove the side muscles from the scallops and any sand. Wash well in cold water. Let them drain completely. Dice or cube them and put them in a large ceramic or glass container.
3) Zest the lime and lemon and juice the lime and lemon over the scallop pieces. Stir and refrigerate for about 3 hours. Add shrimp pieces after 2 hours.
4) Before serving add cilantro, bell peppers, tomatoes, scallions, cucumber, onion, and season with salt and sriracha sauce to taste.
5) Place the container on ice to keep everything cold.

Friday, December 23, 2016

Fried Wings (makes 24 wings)

I don't eat a whole lot of fried foods but I do like to eat these Fried Wings once in a great while. I am not too fond of wings dripping with sauce. Most of the time I find the BBQ sauce or Buffalo wing sauce too overwhelming for my taste buds. I prefer my wings with as little sauce as possible. Here is a simple wing recipe. Feel free to smother them in your favorite sauce or dipping if interested!

My eldest maternal aunt, whom I called Tùa Ý makes her delicious fried wings simply with just salt and ground black pepper. To me they are simple but very tasty.

Fried Wings
Fried Wings (makes 24 wings)

Ingredients:

24 chicken wings (about 3 lbs), separated the wings (by cutting at the joint), trimmed off fat and excess skin, washed, patted dried with paper towels
1/3 cup of store-bought Cajun Fish Fry Flour*
Oil for deep frying

Method:

Coat the wings with flour. Heat oil to around 350-360 degrees Fahrenheit and then deep fry the wings for about 5-6 minutes or until golden brown.

*The Fry Krisp Company makes the Cajun Fish Fry Flour. It is a mixture of corn flour, corn meal, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, pepper, and a few other spices. The idea is to coat the wings with flour and then deep fry them. I used a plastic bag, add the wings and flour and shake a few times to help coat all the wings evenly. During frying I cover my pot with a splatter guard to help prevent spattering. If you dry the wings well then there will be less oil spattering.

Simple Fried Chicken Wings--Auntie's Style

Ingredients:

Chicken wings, separated the wings (by cutting at the joint), trimmed off fat and excess skin, washed, patted dried with paper towels
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Oil for deep frying

Method:

Sprinkle a little salt and pepper all over the wings. Heat oil to around 350-360 F degrees and then deep fry these for about 5-6 minutes or until golden brown.

Simple Sauteed Gnocchi (serves 2)

Simple Sauteed Gnocchi
Here is an easy but tasty dish using parmigiano reggiano (cheese) and home-made gnocchi.

Simple Sauteed Gnocchi (serves 2)

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp olive oil, plus a few more drizzles
1 shallot, peeled and thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, smashed and minced
About 1 Tbsp chopped scallion
5-6 thin slices of salami, stack and cut into strips
1-lb Home-Made Herb Speck Gnocchi
A pinch of salt
Parmigiano reggiano, sliced or grated (garnish)
Dried or fresh chopped curly leaf parsley (garnish)

Method:

1) Heat a non-stick pan over high heat. Once the pan is hot add oil.
2) Add shallot, garlic and scallions. Saute for about 30 seconds to a minute.
3) Add salami and cook for about a minute.
4) Add the gnocchi and season with salt if needed. Give the contents a few tosses. Remove from heat after about a minute.
5) Divide contents into 2 plates. Add sliced or grated parmigiano reggiano cheese and sprinkle the parsley on top. May add a few drizzles of olive oil on top if interested.

*If you are using dried parsley then you can crumble some with your palms before adding to the food. I never can use up the fresh parsley so I always dry them in the kitchen to use later.
*You can also use prosciutto instead of salami. The meat and cheese have lots of salt so you may not need to add any additional salt to your dish.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Georgia's Avgolemono (about 6-7 servings)

avgolemono with a sprinkle of freshly ground white pepper
I personally think avgolemono, a Greek lemon and egg soup is absolutely delicious. Perhaps because I prefer the sour taste over sweet or salty flavors. I have not eaten this soup for several years and realize it is time to make some. I got in touch with my lovely former co-worker Georgia for the recipe. I met her while she was working as a pharmacy technician and attending pharmacy school. Sometimes we ate lunch together and I always found her stories of her visits to see her Greek grandmother (in Greece) fascinating. Georgia left her pharmacy tech job after she graduated from college and is currently working as a Clinical Lab Specialist. I think her coworkers are very lucky to be working with her. 

Georgia tells me she generally uses about 6 cups of chicken broth, a little olive oil, 1/2 to 1 cup of orzo, 2-3 lemons (depending on the size), 2 eggs, salt and ground pepper. According to Georgia you can add bits of chicken in the soup (as I did here in this recipe) if you make the stock from scratch. Some people even add carrots or fish. 

Thank you Georgia for sharing your recipe and ideas!

Georgia's Avgolemono (about 6-7 servings)

Ingredients:

8 cups of chicken broth (low sodium)
1 cup orzo
About 2 lbs skin-less chicken thighs with bones
Juice from 3 lemons (about 1/2 cup of juice)
3 large eggs
Salt to taste
Freshly ground white pepper, garnish

Method:

In a large pot cook the orzo and chicken thighs in the broth until the orzo is cooked (about 15 minutes).  Skim and discard any impurities that float to the top. Gently whisk the lemon juice and the eggs until well blended. While whisking lemon juice and eggs slowly pour in about a cup of the boiling stock from the broth to temper the eggs and lemon mixture. Season with salt (I used about 3/4 teaspoon). Turn off heat and cover the pot. After 45 minutes to an hour remove the chicken thighs. Remove the meat from one thigh and discard the bone. Chop up the meat. Return the chopped chicken back into the soup. Serve with a little freshly ground white pepper.

*I purchased 4 "all natural" chicken thighs with bone-in and skin-on. The skin-on chicken is a lot cheaper to buy than skin-less. Once home I removed and discarded the skin and fat. I added the whole pieces in the broth to cook for a more flavorful broth. I shredded only one piece of the chicken thigh because I do not want to overwhelm my soup with the chicken. I saved the rest of the thighs for another meal.
*I omitted adding the ground pepper to the pot but will add a little freshly ground white pepper when I ladle out in a bowl prior to eating.

Grandma Beasley's Stewed Potatoes (about 3 servings)

Grandma Beasley's Stewed Potatoes
I met my beautiful friend Hilda when we both were working as Nurse Managers at a community hospital in Rhode Island. The role was quite stressful with many long hours but very educational. I gained many useful skills and knowledge that helped me in my career to this day. I was thankful to have a friend and colleague who was supportive, kind and caring as Hilda. Her staff was also very lucky to have her as their boss. After I worked there over a year I resigned and left the country to backpack in Asia until the start of my next job. Hilda stayed and worked until she retired from her management position. To this day I am amazed but not surprised by her hard work, dedication and commitment to her job. After retirement, she and her husband Bill relocated to Ohio to be near family. 

Recently Hilda shared with me her special childhood memory of stewed potatoes made over a wood stove. "Whenever I was sick as a child my grandma or mom would make me stewed potatoes because that was what I would eat. They were so good." She remembers it was creamy and the sliced potatoes were very tender. She believes many of the ingredients such as milk, butter and potatoes probably all came from their own farm. She had attempted to make this stew many times but according to her, "I have not mastered that after all these years. My grandma still made the best". When I heard her description of the stew I was intrigued. Although I have never eaten this type of stew I take it as a challenge to myself to find a way to replicate this for my friend. Here is a stew that is creamy with tender sliced potatoes. Hilda, I know this stew will never be as good as your grandma Beasley's but I really hope my interpretation of it is somewhat of a close match to hers!

Grandma Beasley's Stewed Potatoes (about 3 servings)

Ingredients:

1 small white or yellow onion (about 3 1/2 oz), peeled and grated
2 Idaho or Russet potatoes, peeled, quartered lengthwise and sliced thinly (see photo below)
2 tsp oil
1 thin slice of pancetta, diced (about 2 oz)
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
2 cups whole milk
1/4 cup whipping cream
1/2 tsp salt

Method:

Grate the onion and set aside. Peel and thinly slice the potatoes and set aside. The potatoes will turn slightly darker once oxided with oxygen but it should be ok since you are cooking it fairly quickly. In a medium sized pot add a little oil and saute the pancetta pieces until they are lightly golden. Scoop out the pancetta pieces and set them aside (may use for garnish later). Add onion to the pot with the pancetta oil and saute about 1-2 minutes or until it is soft and somewhat translucent. Add potato slices and butter. Saute about 5 minutes in medium low heat. Add milk, cream and season with salt. Turn the heat up to medium. Once the liquid starts to bubble a little, turn the heat to the lowest setting and cover the pot. Avoid boiling the liquid. Cook at very low heat for about 30 to 45 minutes or until the potato slices are very tender. After about 20 minutes into cooking take a large scoop of the potato slices with a little liquid and puree them either in a food processor or blender. Be sure to let this contents cool down a little before you puree or blend. Return the pureed potatoes back into the pot to continue cooking. I like to garnish the finished stew with some fried diced pancetta and a sprinkle of freshly ground white pepper.

thinly sliced potatoes
*I used the Idaho or Russet potatoes because they are starchy. Check out this interesting Reader's Digest link on Potatoes 101: A Guide to the Most Common Varieties. After cooking for a long time the stew will thicken.
*If you do not have pancetta you may use bacon. Besides, if I have to guess Grandma Beasley probably used bacon from the pigs on her farm to make this! I personally like pancetta and I can easily purchase a small piece at the deli section (at my local grocery). Typically the grocery store (in the US) sells bacon in a standard package that comes with about 20 slices. It's impossible to buy just a few slices.
*If you do not have a food processor or a blender you may use a potato masher or a ricer. 

How to Prepare Tongues For Eating

young goat and lamb tongues from the farm

prepared tongues ready to be cooked
Preparing tongues for eating is quite simple and this is my method. After you complete this task then cut and cook them however you please.

Wash the tongue well in water, use salt to rub and scrape the tongue with a knife. Rinse well. If using young animal tongues, let them gently boil (with or without a little salt) for about 10 minutes. For larger tongues such as cow's tongues, I let them gently boil for about 30 to 45 minutes. Be sure the tongues are submerged in the water. You may partially cover the pot to save energy and help the tongues cook faster. Remove the tongues and let them cool completely before handling. Once cooled take a sharp knife and peel the skin (outer layer) of each tongue. Remove and discard any soft tissues located under the tongue. Wash them well under cold water and they are ready to be used in cooking.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Monkfish Liver Pâté

monkfish liver pâté on toasted baguette slices with a sprinkle of Hawaiian lava sea salt
I enjoy eating monkfish liver but unfortunately for me they are rarely available. I was more than thrilled when my friend Ralph messaged me that he had some livers for me! One of his fisherman friends caught the monkfish off the coast of New England. After I pulled out all the visible parasites I wrapped the livers up and put them in the freezer. Now it is time to create a pâté with some of them. I thawed the livers in the refrigerator overnight. Although they have been in the freezer they still taste fresh. I think these livers are mild in comparison to canned tuna fish. My husband agrees that this pâté is delicious with toasted baguette slices with either a dollop of caviar or a sprinkle of sea salt on top...and of course, the drink of choice is good sake! Thank you Ralph and your friend for the tasty livers!

If interested you may check out my previous post, Fried Monkfish Liver. This post has a photo of the parasites that I was referring to earlier. While cleaning the livers the parasites may catch some of you off guard especially if you are not looking for them or have never seen them before. Don't be too concerned about them...particularly if you are planning on serving your guests these good looking hors d'oeuvre for the upcoming holiday season. After a good freeze and a few pulses in a food processor I can assure you that your guests and even you will not notice them. As my husband often likes to remind me,"it's just extra protein"! I am glad I am married to a fearless man! 

Here are two excellent links I found on sake.
Sake 101:  A Beginner's Guide to Sake and Fifty Best Sake.

monkfish liver pâté on toasted baguette slices with a dollop of caviar on top
Monkfish Liver Pâté

Ingredients:

5 monkfish livers (about 10 oz), washed well, removed any visible parasites, veins and membranes removed
1/2 cup of any good sake (Japanese rice wine)
1/2 cup beef marrow (from 1-lb beef bone marrow)
2 shallots, finely chopped (about 1/3 cup)
1 thumbnail size ginger, grated (about 1/2 tsp grated)
2 garlic cloves, grated (about 1 tsp)
1 small bunch of scallions, green parts only, chopped (about 1/3 cup)
4 dried shiitake mushrooms, hydrated in warm water, stems removed, finely chopped (about 1/3 cup)
1/4 cup whipping cream or heavy cream
2 tsp fish sauce (I used the 3 crabs brand)
1/2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp freshly ground white pepper

Method:

1) Soak the livers in sake for about 15-20 minutes. Do this first while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.
2) Wash the beef bone marrow in cold water. Gently boil the bones in a little water for about 3 minutes. Remove from heat and gently wash the bones. Add the bones back in the pot and put in enough water just to cover all the bones. Gently boil the bones for about 5 minutes or until the marrow can be removed easily. Remove the marrow and place it in a pan.
3) Heat the pan with the marrow over medium high heat. Add shallots, ginger, garlic, scallions and mushrooms. Saute about 3 minutes or until everything is soft. Break the marrow into small pieces with the spatula. Turn heat lower if the pan gets too hot.
4) Pour in the liver and the sake. Cook for about 15 minutes or until the sake has been cooked off. Try to break the liver into small pieces with the spatula.

still too much liquid
5) Add heavy cream and season with fish sauce, sugar and pepper. Cook for about another 5 minutes and turn off heat. Let everything cool down.

at the end of cooking it should look somewhat like this
6) Once the contents have been cooled down a little then blend everything in a food process.
7) Portion the finished pâté in small glass jars or ramekins. Use plastic wrap over the ramekins to prevent the pâté from drying out. Keep refrigerated. Serve warm or cold.

*If you have a hand-held blender then you may want to use a pot instead of pan to start cooking beginning at step 3.
*If you cannot remove all the veins or membranes do not worry too much since this pâté will not be too smooth.
*Once the pâté has been kept in the refrigerator you can take it out and leave it at room temperature for about 15 minutes in order for it to spread easily.
*You certainly can substitute salt for the fish sauce if you think it may help reduce the fishy smell.  

Addendum:
It is best to serve the pâté same day if possible since the taste is much better. I kept a portion in the freezer as a test to see how it will taste later. After thawing it in the refrigerator I find the taste to be quite fishy and not as good as when freshly made.

Monday, November 14, 2016

Hákarl (Icelandic Fermented Shark Meat)

Hákarl (Icelandic Fermented Shark Meat)
Have you ever eaten or heard of hákarl or Icelandic fermented shark meat? I was introduced to this Icelandic delicacy by our friends Julia and Andy. Julia visited Iceland for her friend's wedding and returned home with a small container of this exotic meat for us to taste and smell. A small group of us sampled these ammonia smelling meat cubes (outside the house) followed by gulping down several shots of vodka...hoping to mask the smell and prevent any after taste. For some reason no one seemed to be too thrilled for a second bite. Andy and Julia wrapped the container tightly in layers and gave me the rest to take home. I think secretly they were overjoyed to have a recipient for the leftovers. For some people the smell is strong and perhaps even a bit offensive--some have described it as "rotten or gangrenous" meat. When I tasted the meat I realized I ate something similar in my past but I could not put my finger on it. On the drive home I realized during my previous trip back to Vietnam my cousin Khiem made me some dried sting ray. If you like hákarl then you may enjoy my Grilled Dried Sting Ray (or Kho Ca Duoi Nuong). Although the dried sting ray did not have as strong a taste or aroma. My cousin Ngoc made a nice tamarind sauce but omitted the fish sauce. Below is a recipe for the sauce that is inspired by my mother. She thinks the tamarind fish sauce would go well with it. You can dip the meat in the sauce or coat the meat in the sauce and serve it as I did. Although I did not grow up eating either the
hákarl or dried sting ray I did not mind them. I would eat them again if given a chance. Luckily the weather outside is warm so we opened all the windows and doors to air out the smell in our home before we can accept any future guests. Hopefully my neighbors don't call the police because they smelled decomposing flesh!

Below are are few interesting links on hákarl:

Hákarl
http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/icelandic-cuisine-hakarl-iceland-fermented-shark.html

Hákarl (Icelandic Fermented Shark Meat) in Tamarind-Fish-Chili-Sauce

Ingredients:

About 1/2 cup cubed Hákarl (Icelandic Fermented Shark Meat), roughly 3-oz
1 recipe of Tamarind-Fish-Chili Sauce (see recipe below)

Method:

Make the Tamarind-Fish-Chili Sauce and mix in the Hákarl (Icelandic Fermented Shark Meat) until all the meat has been coated. Add more chili pepper if interested.

Tamarind-Fish-Chili Sauce 

Ingredients:

About 3 Tbsp water
About 1 Tbsp tamarind pulp
A squirt of chili pepper
About 1/2 tsp fish sauce
About 1/2 tsp brown sugar

Method:

Heat water and tamarind pulp in a small pot or pan. Avoid boiling. Mash the pulp gently to remove as much of the tamarind as possible. Strain the liquid and scrape the back of the bottom of a strainer to remove as much tamarind sauce as possible. Return the liquid and tamarind sauce into a clean pan or pot. Add chili pepper, fish sauce and sugar. Stir until the sugar has dissolved.

Sunday, November 13, 2016

Chicken and Shrimp in Oyster Ginger Sauce (serves 4-5 as part of a shared meal)

Chicken and Shrimp in Oyster Ginger Sauce
A few months ago I visited my friend Joannie and her beautiful family. Joannie and I go way back. We met while we were both working for Sears (department store) during my high school years. After we left Sears our lives took us in very different paths in different states but somehow we managed to keep in touch through the years. When I visited I cooked a simple dinner for them. This Chicken and Shrimp in Oyster Ginger Sauce was one of the dishes that I made. Joannie was unsure whether her children would eat anything that has a strong ginger taste. Typically I prefer this dish with a mega-dose of ginger. However, for Joannie's family I made it mild using only a small amount of grated ginger. I think her family must have liked it because they ate it all! When you make this you can certainly add as much or as little of the ingredients as you prefer. I normally serve this with steamed rice with a side dish of steamed vegetables or fresh vegetables such as cucumber, tomatoes, lettuce and other herbs.

You can make this using just shrimp or chicken without mixing the two. You may substitute chicken with pork if interested. Recently my mother gave me a similar dish but she used pork riblets and it was delicious. Below are a few similar posts.

Ginger Braised Pork Spare Ribs
Sauteed Frog Legs in Ginger and Garlic Oyster Sauce
Sauteed Shrimp, Shiitake Mushrooms and Ginger

Also, if you like the Grateful Dead then you will surely enjoy this amazing tribute band known as DeadBeat. Joannie's husband Brian is in this band. The last few times we saw the band played both in New Hampshire and Massachusetts venues Brian was the lead singer. You may check out their website and listen to a few songs they have posted on-line. And if you are interested in writing any fan letters you can contact them on-line!! Thank you Brian and your band for entertaining us!!


DeadBeat at Stone Church in Newmarket, New Hampshire (2014)
Shrimp and Chicken in Oyster Ginger Sauce (serves 4-5 as part of a shared meal)

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp oil (canola, vegetables or use what you have available)
1 small yellow or white onion, peeled, cut into wedges 
About 2-oz ginger, peeled, a mixture of both grated and julienned
3 fresh or dry chili peppers (keep whole if you want less heat)
About 1 1/2 pounds chicken thighs, removed as much of the fat as possible, cut into bite size
About 1/2 pound shrimp, butterflied, de-veined (by removing the dark intestines)
2 large garlic cloves, peeled, grated
3 Tbsp oyster sauce
1 Tbsp dark soy sauce
1/2 Tbsp fish sauce
1 tsp sugar
1 bunch of scallions, green parts only, chopped (about 1/3 cup)
Freshly ground black or white pepper

Method:

1) Heat oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add onion, julienned ginger, and chili. Saute for about 1-2 minutes or until the onion is soft.
2) Add chicken. Saute about 3 minutes or until the chicken is somewhat cooked.
3) Add Shrimp, garlic and grated ginger. Saute about a minute.
4) Season with oyster sauce, soy sauce, fish sauce and sugar. Saute about another 3 minutes or until the shrimp are cooked.
5) Turn off heat and add the scallions. Stir for about 30 seconds to mix all ingredients together.
6) Garnish with freshly ground peppers and more chopped scallions if interested.

ingredients with hand grater
*If you prefer more heat then slice the chili peppers in half.
*If you want to make the sauce thicker then make a mixture using a little cornstarch and a little water and pour this in the pan about 1 minute before done. 

Potato Salad (serves about 3)

Potato Salad
I have eaten many potato salads (some tasty and some not so good) but somehow I have never attempted to make any. I decided to make a salad with ingredients that I like and most importantly already have in my kitchen, to eat with my beer-battered fried cod. This is a rough estimate of the ingredients I used. This recipe is not overly sweet, sour or salty. Feel free to adjust the ingredients and add or omit what you want in your own salad. My husband likes this salad with lots of eggs and he thinks it is tasty.

Potato Salad (serves about 3)

Ingredients:

2 Idaho potatoes, boiled, peeled, diced into bite size
3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled, roughly chopped
About 1/3 cup chopped red onion
About 1/3 cup chopped "Bread & Butter" pickles
About 1/2 cup light sour cream
About 2 Tbsp mayonnaise
About 1 Tbsp mustard
A little squeeze of lemon juice
A little chopped fresh herbs (such as parsley, chives, tarragon, dill or any mild herbs)
A few pinches of salt

Method:

Mix all ingredients until well blended. May adjust the ingredients and season with salt according to your taste.

*The "Bread & Butter" are sweeter pickles and the jar I used labeled "no salt".
*I used Hellmann's real mayonnaise and Gulden's spicy brown mustard. 

Friday, November 11, 2016

Ivanka's Cucumber and Tomato Salad (about 4 servings)

Ivanka's Cucumber and Tomato Salad

This salad is inspired by my Czech-American friend Ivanka. I added tomatoes, red onion and mint leaves for colors, texture, and extra nutrients. This salad is simple but very tasty.

Ivanka's Cucumber and Tomato Salad (about 4 servings)

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp vinegar
2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp freshly ground black or white pepper
1 European cucumber, sliced
1 pint grape tomatoes, halved
A few thin slices of red onion
A few mint leaves, hand torn or sliced

Method:

Mix the vinegar, sugar and pepper in a small bowl and set aside.
In a large bowl add cucumber, tomatoes, red onion, mint leaves and drizzle the vinegar-sugar-pepper mixture over everything. Toss everything well and serve.

Ivanka's Vienna Schnitzel (serves 4)

Ivanka's Vienna Schnitzel
My Czech-American friend Ivanka shared with me another wonderful dish...this time it is Vienna Schnitzel. It is similar to the Japanese chicken or pork katsu that is often served with tonkatsu sauce typically found on a Japanese restaurant menu across the United States. Perhaps the Japanese were inspired by the European schnitzel. Ivanka tells me in Czech Republic they use more pork than chicken or veal. She pounds the meat flat. Once I saw her improvised this technique using a hammer because she did not have a meat mallet or meat tenderizer. Well, it worked and they came out delicious! She would dredge the pounded meat in flour, next dip it in an egg batter and then lastly coat with breadcrumbs. Most Europeans serve the fried meat simply with lemon slices. However, sometimes she uses a brown sauce on the side which is not typical. Other side dishes for the schnitzel may include potato salad or boiled potatoes, cucumber salad, dumplings, sauteed sauerkraut or red cabbage in bacon, caraway seeds and fresh garlic. She buys her sauerkraut in a jar, drains it, washes it in water, and cooks it. At the end of cooking the sauerkraut she adds a little sugar so it is not sour. Sometimes I prefer schnitzel with steamed vegetables, steamed rice and a combination of light soy and lemon juice sauce. However you decide how to serve it I am sure it will turn out tasty. My husband tells me this is the best schnitzel he has ever tasted...perhaps he is a little biased?! Thank you Ivanka for your friendship and for sharing your recipes!


meat, flour, egg, and breadcrumbs
breaded meat
Ivanka's Vienna Schnitzel (serves 4)

Ingredients:

4 thin pieces of pork slices (about 1 pound)
About 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 large egg
1 Tbsp milk
A pinch of salt
A pinch of pepper
About 3/4 cup store-bought breadcrumbs (Italian style)
1 lemon, washed, cut in wedges

Method:

1) Place a slice of pork in plastic and pound it (using a mallet, meat tenderizer or even a hammer) as flat as you can get it. Put it aside. Repeat with the other pieces.
2) Spread all-purpose flour on one plate.
3) Break an egg in a bowl. Use a fork and lightly whisk in milk, salt and pepper.
4) Spread the breadcrumbs on the another plate.
5) Dredge the pork slice in flour first and shake off excess flour. Next dip it in the egg batter and let some of the egg mixture drips off. Then lastly drop it into the breadcrumbs. Shovel the breadcrumbs with your fingers to coat both sides of the meat. Repeat for the other pieces of meat.
6) Fry the coated meat in hot pan with a little oil. Avoid overcrowding the meat in the pan. I use medium high heat. You may turn the heat down a little if the pan gets too hot. Fry until both sides are golden brown. You may have to wipe the pan with a paper towel clean before frying the next batch. Do this carefully so you do not burn your fingers. Frying time takes about 6-8 minutes depending on how thin your meat is and your heat source. Serve with lemon wedges.

*For this recipe I used thin cut pork sirloin cutlets.

This salad is inspired by my Czech-American friend Ivanka. I added tomatoes, red onion and mint leaves for colors, texture, and extra nutrients. This salad is simple but very tasty.

Ivanka's Cucumber and Tomato Salad
Ivanka's Cucumber and Tomato Salad (about 4 servings)

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp vinegar
2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp freshly ground black or white pepper
1 European cucumber, sliced
1 pint grape tomatoes, halved
A few thin slices of red onion
A few mint leaves, hand torn or sliced

Method:

Mix the vinegar, sugar and pepper in a small bowl and set aside.
In a large bowl add cucumber, tomatoes, red onion, mint leaves and drizzle the vinegar-sugar-pepper mixture over everything. Toss everything well and serve.

Boiled Potatoes

Boil potatoes with the skin intact until you can pierce a fork into the middle. Avoid cooking too long or the potatoes will become too mushy. Peel the skin and roughly cut each potato into bite size. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt if interested.

*I used Idaho potatoes but you may use another type. The potatoes were large so I used one for 2 servings.

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Saba Sashimi (appetizers for 1-2)

saba sashimi
From my previous post How to Prepare Fresh Caught Mackerel for Sashimi, I mentioned that my parents went out to sea with their friends and fished for mackerel. They saved some for me which I turned into saba sashimi! Actually I am not sure what to call it but saba sashimi sounds good--it's a cross between sashimi and ceviche. Whatever this dish is, it is delicious according to my husband. Here is the recipe. Adjust by adding more or less of the ingredients depending on your taste. I used store bought Ponzu Citrus Seasoned Dressing & Sauce and added a few extra ingredients to pull everything together. I like how this dish turns out and I would definitely make it again.

Saba Sashimi (appetizers for 1-2) 

Ingredients:

2 prepared mackerel fillets (see How to Prepare Fresh Caught Mackerel for Sashimi post), washed well in cold water, patted dry with paper towels, cut into about 1/4 inch pieces
A little chopped scallions (green parts only)
A little finely diced onion
A little grated fresh ginger
A little lemon zest
About 5 fresh mint leaves, cut into small strips

Method:

Sprinkle a little of scallions, onion, ginger and mint over the mackerel pieces and serve with Ponzu Sauce (see below).

Ponzu Sauce

The sauce consists of a tablepsoon of store-bought Ponzu Citrus Seasoned Dressing & Sauce (Kikkoman brand), a squirt of Sriracha Hot Chili Sauce, a little chopped scallions (green parts only), a little finely diced onion, a little grated ginger and a little lemon zest.

*Addendum:
The Ponzu Sauce may be a bit sour which may be too much for some people. For the second batch I made a sauce using half store-bought Ponzu Citrus Seasoned Dressing & Sauce (Kikkoman brand) and soy sauce. For the third batch I made a sauce using store bought Sashimi Soy Sauce (Yamasa brand). My husband and I prefer this last sauce.

How to Prepare Fresh Caught Mackerel for Sashimi

How to Prepare Fresh Caught Mackerel for Sashimi

Over the last few years my parents and their friends would go on these exciting fishing excursions off the coast of Maine. The friends have a boat so they can go anywhere and anytime. They generally go when the mackerel are running and this year they caught a large cooler full of them. They gutted the fish and kept them either in the refrigerator to be eaten right away or in the freezer to be eaten at another time. They probably bled some of these fish briefly but only during the cleaning process...a method they typically do not practice since they generally eat these fish cooked. 

You bleed the fish when it is still alive by cutting the artery near the gills. You turn the fish with the belly up or facing you and cut either with a sharp knife or a pair of scissors deep into the tip of the upside "V" located between the gills. Let the fish bleed out for about 25-30 minutes on ice or in a cold place such as a refrigerator. This bleeding technique is used by the Japanese for sushi grade fish. It will help decrease the fishy odor when eating raw. After you bleed it then you can scale it and gut it. Luckily for me mackerel are scale-less. These mackerel that my parents gave me were kept frozen...ideal for eating raw. The process of freezing fish will make the environment less suitable for the parasites to survive. Although having said this you can never be too careful. If you have any health problems you should consult with your health care providers before consuming any raw seafood. One thing you should never ever do, no matter your health status is eat raw fresh water fish as they can carry harmful parasites that can infect you. If you are unsure on how to properly handle seafood to eat raw then let the experts do it and you should refrain from taking a chance. When I write "experts" I do not mean any fish mongers from any markets. Some supermarkets will have signs stating the fish is "sushi grade" but the workers may not have proper training in handling them. Poor handing of seafood, cross contamination of fresh water fish with sushi grade fish and eating any seafood or fish with parasites can cause you to become very ill or worse...dead.

I thaw 3 frozen mackerel (given to me by my parents) in a glass container in the refrigerator overnight for about 12 hours. After 12 hours I sprinkled about 1/4 cup of salt in the fish cavities and the exterior and kept them in the refrigerator for another 6 hours. Why thawing for 12 hours and salting for 6 hours you may ask. Well, I had to work...maybe even had to care for patients who had eaten poor handling of seafood for example! I fillet them into 6 pieces, remove all the bones that I could see and feel with my fingers, wash them well in cold water, and pat the pieces dry with paper towels. I then sprinkle another 1/4 cup of salt over the flesh of the fish. I refrigerate them for another 2 hours. I rinse the fillets several times in cold water to remove the salt. At this stage you can stick your nose close to the fillet pieces and there should be just a slight hint of the mackerel aroma. The final step is to submerge the pieces flesh down and skin side up in vinegar for about 2-3 hours in the refrigerator. The vinegar will "cook" the mackerel and makes the meat firm up. Hopefully after this treatment the fish should be a lot safer to eat. This post is for fresh caught mackerel, not for store bought mackerel. Remember, just because I eat this food does not mean it is safe for you to eat it too.

This time I fillet the fish by using a sharp knife starting from the head keeping my blade as close to the bones as possible and slicing in a steady position all the way down to the tail. I use this same method for the other side to get 2 beautiful fillets. You can keep the center bones to make a nice soup. See my previous post on How to Fillet Fish. Stay tuned for my next post on Saba Sashimi! YUM!

My father caught 2 fish on one line!
(Maine, 2016)
wild mackerel
(Maine, 2016)
salted fish fillets over 2 hours
fish bones (may use to make a broth)
after the salt has been rinsed off in cold water
mackerel fillets submerge in vinegar
after soaking 2-3 hours in vinegar--
the meat is firm and ready to eat

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Ivanka's Chicken Paprikash (kuře na paprice)--serves about 10

Ivanka's chicken paprikash
You may remember my friend Ivanka from my recent post on Ivanka's Czech Guláš. After she returned home (to Colorado) she wrote me a lovely note including a description of her Chicken Paprikash (known as kuře na paprice in Czech) along with several beautiful postcards from Prague and photos. Here is my interpretation of this creamy chicken dish based on what she shared with me. Thank you Ivanka for the lovely pictures and delicious recipe!

Ivanka's Chicken Paprikash (kuře na paprice)--serves about 10

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp oil
1 large sweet onion (about 12 oz), peeled, chopped
2 Tbsp Hungarian paprika
1 tsp ground black or white pepper
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
10 skinless chicken thighs (preferably with bones in), about 4-lbs
2 tomatoes (about 10 oz), skin and seeds removed, diced
5 bay leaves
32-oz chicken stock, fat free, reduced sodium
8-oz water
1 tsp salt
473 mL (pint) light cream
8 oz light sour cream

Method:

1) In a large pot saute onion in oil for about 10 minutes over medium high heat or until the onion is soft and slightly golden.
2) Add paprika, pepper, and flour. Saute about 30 seconds to a minute. May reduce heat a little to prevent the paprika from burning.
3) Add chicken, tomatoes, bay leaves and stock. Add extra water if needed in order to keep the chicken submerge. Turn the heat to medium high. Once the liquid comes to a boil turn heat to low and cover the pot. Cook for about 30 minutes or until the chicken is soft but not falling off the bones.
4) Remove the chicken. Season the broth with salt. Let the broth cool down.
5) Strain everything in the pot, remove and discard the bay leaves and puree the solid pieces with a little broth. Return the pureed liquid back to the pot.
6) Add the light cream and sour cream. Whisk until everything is blended and smooth looking. Return the cooked chicken back into the sauce and heat up the pot. Avoid boiling. Season with more salt if interested. Serve hot.

*According to Ivanka you may use skinless chicken legs, breasts, thighs or a combination of these. I prefer to use the chicken with the bones-in as they add more flavor.
*Ivanka tells me to add sour cream or whipped cream or half of each. I used sour cream and light cream for this dish. This dish is creamy but not heavy.
*I prefer to use sweet onion. You can use either white or yellow onion.
*I score the tomato with an "X" and put in boiling water for about 30 seconds to help peel the skin.  
*I used a 5 1/2 quart cast iron pot.
*You can serve this dish with dumplings, rice or noodles. I serve it with pasta. Use whatever utensils you have or prefer but I use chopsticks to eat pasta since I can eat it faster than a fork.

Friday, October 21, 2016

New England Clam Chowder (about 6-7 servings)

New England clam chowder

I love to eat a good piping hot bowl of clam chowder especially on a cool and/or rainy day. I prefer my chowder to be more soupy and light with lots of clams instead of thick and heavy. I think the best tasting chowders are made using half and half and fresh clam broth to create a light broth. There is nothing better than to load up on fresh clams. Here I use Downeast steamer clams (from Maine) and cherrystone clams. The result is delicious!

New England Clam Chowder (about 6-7 servings)

Ingredients:

2.2 lbs Downeast steamer clams (about 1 cup of chopped clam meat)
About 1 1/2 lbs cherrystone clams (about 3/4 cup chopped clam meat)
1 Tbsp vegetable oil (use what you have) or butter
1 medium yellow onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
3 1/2 oz pancetta, diced
2 Idaho potatoes, peeled and diced (about 3 cups)
1 small stick celery heart, chopped (optional)
3 cups fresh clam broth (from Downeast steamer clams)
One container half and half (pint or 473 mL)
A handful of sprigs of fresh thyme
1 tsp fish sauce

Method:

1) Soak the clams for about 5-10 minutes, scrub them and let them drain.
2) Use a steamer basket and place the Downeast steamer clams inside. Use about 2 cups of cold water to steam the clams for about 3 minutes or until they open up. Remove the clams and reserve the broth for cooking. Remove and discard the loose rough skin on the clams.
3) Boil the cherrystone clams using about 2 cups of cold water. Once the clams opens up remove the clams and reserve the broth (for dipping the clams).
4) Dip the clams into the cherrystone clam broth (from step 3) to remove any bits of shells or grits.
5) Rough chop the clams and reserve.
6) In a large pot over medium high heat. Add oil or butter. Add onion and pancetta. Saute about 1-2 minutes or until the onion is soft.
7) Add potatoes and celery. Saute about 2-3 minutes.
8) Add the clam broth and clams. Once the liquid starts to boil turn the heat down to low. Cook for about 5 minutes. Remove and discard any foam that floats to the top.
9) Add half and half, thyme and season with fish sauce. Turn the heat up a little. Avoid letting the liquid boil. Once the contents have heated up turn off heat and serve.

*I grow the thyme in pots so I can use them when needed. You can remove the leaves and just use them in this chowder. I put some leaves in and some sprigs for a more rustic look. Be sure not to eat these sprigs though. 
*If you don't have access to fresh clams you may use canned clams and canned broth. The fresh clams are very sweet and I highly recommend them.
*The celery heart is more tender so I prefer to use that over the tougher outer ones.
*You can substitute bacon for the pancetta.
*I prefer the Idaho potatoes in this chowder since they are more starchy than some others. Besides they are grown right here in the United States!
*If you are in Idaho you may be interested in this museum: idahopotatomuseum.com 
*Below are a few Fall photos that I took this afternoon near my home in New Hampshire.

pumpkin patch (New Hampshire, 2016)
New Hampshire, 2016
New Hampshire, 2016
New Hampshire, 2016