Friday, March 25, 2016

Sauteed Maui Wild Boar, Baby Shiitake, and Pohole (serves 2 as part of a shared meal)


While on Maui our friends invited us over for a BBQ and we had an abundance of fantastic food including wild boar and venison hunted by one of them. There was so much food that I took some delicious meat home. I purchased some fresh baby shiitake and pohole (fern shoots that grow in the Maui rain forest) and sauteed them with the BBQ wild boar meat. This is a tasty way to extend another meal with some leftovers! Thank you Curt and family for your hospitality and friendship!

Check out my other pohole recipe: Sauteed Maui Pohole and Beef Heart

Sauteed Maui Wild Boar, Baby Shiitake, and Pohole (serves 2 as part of a shared meal)

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp oil
1 tsp grated garlic clove
1 tsp of grated ginger
1 bunch of pohole (fern shoots), washed, trimmed off a little of the ends cut into 1-inch lengths
4 oz baby shiitake mushrooms, wiped or gently washed, trimmed off the ends
About 6 oz of cooked wild boar meat, sliced into 1/4 inch widths
1/4 cup pork broth
1 Tbsp soy sauce
A pinch of brown sugar

Method:

1) Heat a pan with oil over medium high heat. Add garlic and ginger. Saute about 30 seconds. Try not to burn the garlic.
2) Add the pohole and shiitake mushrooms. Saute about 7 minutes or until everything is a little wilted.
3) Add the wild boar slices and broth. Season with soy sauce and brown sugar. Cook for about another 2-3 minutes or until the meat is heat through.

Linguine and Steamers (serves 3-4)

This is a pasta and steamers (also known as soft-shell clams) dish that I make about 2-3 times per year when I feel like eating it. Most of the time I eat the clams fresh out of a pot when they are still tongue burning hot! I seldom cook with canned foods but I do have a stock of them in my basement for end of the world doomsday, a bad winter storm, a cold rainy day or just plain lazy day. This time I am making it because it is a rainy, cold, and lazy day! I do like to add a few extra ingredients to this dish such as fresh cooked whole steamers (or clams), garlic, onion and some kind of vegetable to make it more nutritious and satisfying. I prefer to use the baby arugula since I like the taste and the leaves do not get mushy when cooked. I always reserve the steamers' broth to use for cooking. Fresh broth is so much better since it is very sweet and tasty (not to mention cleaner and healthier) in comparison to store bought. I like to save any unused broth in a container or bottle and store it in the freezer for another day. You can compost the shells, black covering and siphon tips. As long as I could remember my mother has always composted all of her seafood shells in her backyard in Maine. She believes her garden soil is rich and full of nutrients from decades of composting!

steamed clam with black covering removed and tip of siphon cut
cooked plump looking steamers (or clams)

Linguine and Steamers (serves 3-4)

Ingredients:

About 3 lbs steamers (soft-shell clams), washed well, steamed, removed the clams from their shells, reserved the clean broth
2 tsp oil
4 garlic cloves, smashed and finely chopped
1/2 medium sweet onion, finely chopped
1 can (15 oz) Italian Style White Clam Sauce (made with fresh clams)
1 package of fresh baby arugula (7 oz)
1 lb of cooked linguine (or any type of pasta you prefer), follow the package instruction on how to cook if you use store bought dried pasta
1 1/2 cups clam broth
About a Tbsp of dry parsley (half goes into the pan and the other half to garnish each serving plate)
A drizzle of przyprawa w plynie (Maggi brand) on each serving plate prior to eating if interested

Method:

1) Steam the steamers (clams) with a little water (about 1 1/2 cups) until they are just cooked (about 5-6 minutes). I use a little metal pot with a metal basket insert that my mother gave me. Once cooked the shells will open up. Remove the clam from its shells. Pull away the black skin covering and discard it. I also cut off a little of the tip of the siphon or neck with kitchen shears and discard it. After this I hold the siphon and dip the whole clam in its broth to get rid of any extra sand or grits. Once the broth settled then pour the broth to a clean container and discard what's on the bottom (usually sand, shell bits, or grits).
2) Heat a large pan over medium high heat. Add oil. Once the oil is hot add garlic and onion. Saute for about 2 minutes or until the onion is soft.
3) Add the can of clam sauce. Add a handful of arugula at a time to the pan. Add more when the batch inside the pan has somewhat wilted. Stir a few times. Continue to add the arugula until all of it is in the pan. Once wilted the leaves will shrink by a lot. This will take about 2-3 minutes.
4) Add the pasta and broth. Stir until everything is incorporated well and heated through. Add the clams, stir and turn off heat.
5) Crumble about half of the dried parsley into the pan.
6) May season with salt to taste if interested. I prefer to drizzle a little of the przyprawa w plynie and a little of the crumbled parsley on the serving dish right before eating.

*The przyprawa w plynie (Maggi brand) came from a Polish store in Dorchester, Massachusetts. It looks like soy sauce but it is not. However, you may use light soy sauce for substitution instead if interested. My Polish-American friend and former nursing colleague Monika tells me this sauce is commonly used on soups specifically chicken soups.

you may compost the shells,
black covering and siphon tips

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Minty Papaya-Avocado-Banana Smoothie (makes about 4 cups)

I met Allyson at the farmer's market in Makawao (Maui), she invited me to her home to harvest some fresh mint. She has a nice garden in front of her home with different vegetables and my favorite curly mint. Here I used almost equal amounts of ripe papaya, avocado, and apple bananas for this smoothie. The mint gave it a nice refreshing taste. Thank you Allyson!!

Refreshing Papaya-Avocado-Banana Smoothie (makes about 4 cups)

Ingredients:

1/4 large ripe papaya, peeled, seeds removed
1/2 large ripe avocado, peeled and seed removed
3-4 ripe apple bananas, peeled
1 1/2 cup of milk
6 ice cubes
A handful of mint leaves, washed well

Method:

Blend everything in a blender.

Monkfish and Lemon Caper Sauce (serves 2-3)

The first time I saw a monkfish I thought it was scary looking. It has a huge mouth with sharp looking teeth. I hope I never face one while swimming in the ocean. Although this sea creature is not so pretty looking, the meat and the liver are quite tasty. Unfortunately the liver is difficult to purchase since no one seems to carry it. Today I came across some nice fillets of wild caught monkfish at my local market. I bought 4 pieces. I like this fish because the meat stays firm after cooking. My husband has been traveling quite a bit these days so when he is home I like to make him some decent home-cooked meals. Believe it or not my mother actually thinks I am not feeding him. She tells me I should make food he likes to eat and not what I like. Well, today I am making monkfish with a lemon caper sauce since he likes this particular dish. You can serve this with anything you want. I like it with rice and steamed vegetables.

lightly fried monkfish fillets

Lightly Fried Monkfish Fillets

Ingredients:

About 2 Tbsp of oil
4 pieces of fresh monkfish fillets (came to 1.30 lbs)
Enough flour to dust the fillets (I used Abbit's seafood breader mix), about 1/2 cups

Method:

Rinse the monkfish fillets, let them drain. Roll each fillet in the flour and set aside.
Lightly fry the flour coated fillets in a little oil until it is cooked and golden. Use a sharp knife to pierce into the thickest part of the fillet to test for doneness.

lemon caper sauce

Lemon Caper Sauce

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp of salted butter
Juice from 1 large lemon
Grated zest from the same lemon
2 1/2 Tbsp capers
About 1/2 tsp of caper brine
A small pinch of salt

Method:

1) Roll the lemon with your palm against a hard surface before juicing it. Finely grate the lemon skin and save this. Cut the lemon in half.
2) Heat a pan over medium high heat. Add butter, lemon juice, lemon zest, capers, and brine. Gently crush the capers with the back of a spatula. Season with a little salt if interested. This takes about 1-2 minutes to cook.
3) Pour the sauce over the fried monkfish fillets right before consuming.

*For this recipe I prefer to crush the capers since I think they taste better this way. However, you may keep them whole if you like.

Esther's Inspired Stuffed Peppers (makes about 14 red sweet pepper halves)


Esther is a hard working seasoned pharmacy technician whom I met at work. She and I have been eating many of our lunches together since 2008. Over the years we got to know one another well. Recently while on lunch break I was curious to know what she was eating. She explained that she made 6 stuffed bell peppers and had some leftover stuffing so she brought it in to eat. We talked about what ingredients she used for her stuffing. She normally drains and discards any liquid that comes out after cooking the stuffing. She uses Uncle Ben's rice and ground beef. She mentions that this is a very popular dish in her family. Her boyfriend's late father loved it and would ask her when she would make this again while he was still eating them! Esther prefers the colorful bell peppers such as yellow, orange or red. She would cut a small portion off the top of each pepper and chop up the tops to add to her stuffing. During the process of filling the peppers she would add cheese in the middle and top of each one. From Esther's description her stuffed peppers would look more like the green stuffed pepper (minus the top) that I have in the photo below. For my stuffed peppers I added some baby spinach for a little extra vegetable. I used thinner sweet bell peppers instead of the more round bell peppers. My husband and I prefer to eat the thinner peppers. My husband thought the stuffing and pepper ratio is more balanced in these. For the round green bell peppers the pepper added more of a crunch since they are not as cooked as the slimmer ones. If you prefer the pretty looking ones with a crunch then you may want to use the more round bell peppers. If you do then you may want to cook them a little longer. Another reason I like the thinner peppers is the faster cooking time--quicker from oven to my mouth!

stuffed round bell pepper
rice and pork stuffing

Rice and Pork Stuffing (makes about 6 cups)

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp oil
1 small onion, chopped (about 3/4 cup chopped)
1 small bunch of scallions, chopped (about 3/4 cup chopped)
4 garlic cloves, smashed, chopped
1.1 lbs lean ground pork (or use any type of ground meat you prefer)
2 tomatoes, de-seeded, chopped (about 2 cups chopped)
7 oz baby spinach, washed and drained well or placed in a spinner to dry (the less liquid the better)
2 cups cooked rice or leftover days old cooked rice
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
2 tsp soy sauce

Method:

1) Heat a large pan over medium high heat. Add oil.
2) Once the oil is hot stir in onion, scallions, and garlic. Cook for about 1-2 minutes or until the onion is soft.
3) Turn the heat to high. Add pork, break it into small pieces. Cook about 4 minutes. If the heat is too low then there will be more liquid in the pan.
4) Add tomatoes and spinach. Add a few handful of spinach at a time, add more when what you have in the pan has wilted to make room for the next batch or few handful. Cook until everything is wilted.
5) Add rice and season with salt, pepper and soy sauce. Cook until all the liquid is absorbed and the content is a bit dry.

*The stuffing took about 10-12 minutes to cook.

Esther's Inspired Stuffed Peppers (makes about 14 red sweet pepper halves)

Ingredients:

7 red sweet peppers (thin ones), cut in half lengthwise, seeds and the green cores removed
1 recipe of  Rice and Pork Stuffing (see above)
About 6 oz Market Basket Fancy Shredded Italian Cheese (this has a blend of mozzarella, provolone, parmesan, asiago, fontina, and romano cheese)

Method:

1) Preheat the oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
2) Stuff as much of the Rice and Pork Stuffing in each of the pepper half and place on a baking sheet. Once baked the stuffing will shrink if you do not pack it in.
3) Sprinkle the top of each stuffed pepper with cheese.
4) Bake for about 30 minutes (depending on your oven). May crisp the top by putting them on a broiler for 1-2 minutes extra. Be careful not to burn them.

*The stuffing for this recipe is enough to make 14 thin sweet pepper halves. For experimental purposes I used 5 thin sweet peppers to make 10 halves and 2 round green bell peppers. Instead of chopping up the pepper top as Esther normally does I added these to the sheet to bake. This way I can use the cooked tops to place over the peppers to make it look pretty and to keep the contents in the pepper warm. 
*The pre-shredded cheese is a mix of different cheeses, comes in an 8-oz package. It is Market Basket brand and marked for pizza or lasagna. You can choose any type of cheese that you prefer. Add as little or as much as you want.

stuffed peppers ready to bake in the oven
*Below are 2 photos that I took this week from my house. I called this Spring surprise! I believe there were about 8 inches of snow. Below is my car where I had partially cleaned some the snow off so you can see how much snow we got. Luckily it was a fairly warm day so underneath all the snow there was not a thick layer of ice. This is life in the Northeast (of the United States) where one can expect snow from September to April! :D

view from the front of my house March 21, 2016 (Seacoast New Hampshire)
my car covered in fresh fluffy snow (March 21, 2016)

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Lightly Fried Rainbow Trout and Tomato Sauce (3-4 servings as part of a shared meal)

Fried fish and tomato sauce is a classic Vietnamese dish that my family loves to eat. Over the years I have made it using different types of fish and adding different ingredients to the tomato sauce. You can make with as little or as much sauce as you like. This particular dish has a lot of sauce. The tomatoes were large (total over a pound for 2 of them). I prefer to cook whole fish for this particular dish since the bones add extra flavor and the fish turns out more moist. Recently I noticed that my favorite local grocery finally put in a fish counter. There were fresh looking whole trout so I bought a couple that came to about a pound. Choose fish that have clear eyes and red gills--this indicate freshness. If they smell fishy or there is hint of ammonia--it is a sign that they may be going bad. I joked with the guy behind the counter that I have been fishing but I think I will go to his counter to fish more regularly in the future! 

Be sure to scale and clean the fish thoroughly when you bring them home. Trout have tiny scales but it's better if they are removed. I rub salt and/or vinegar on the fish to give it a deep cleaning before cooking.

cleaned fish
Check out a similar dish that I made but with red snapper: Red Snapper with Tomato and Shiitake.

Lightly Fried Rainbow Trout and Tomato Sauce (3-4 servings as part of a shared meal)

Ingredients:

2 trouts (about 1/2 pound each), scaled, gutted, and fins and tails trimmed
A large pinch of salt and ground pepper
All-purpose flour, optional
Oil for cooking (about 2 Tbsp)
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1/2 onion, chopped
2 large tomatoes, de-seeded, chopped
1/4 to 1/2 cup water
1 Tbsp chicken stock powder
2 Tbsp oyster sauce
1/2 tsp sugar
1 tsp cornstarch mix with enough water to dissolve the flour (optional)--to thicken the sauce slightly
1 bunch of scallions, green parts only, chopped
Chopped cilantro leaves, optional (for garnish)

Method:

1) Clean and dry the fish. Score each side of the fish (if interested), rub the sides and inside of the belly with a little salt and pepper. Dust the whole fish with all-purpose flour if you like.
2) Heat a large pan with about a tablespoon of oil over high heat. Once the pan is hot place the fish in the pan, turn down the heat to medium high and cook for 5-7 minutes on each side or until the fish is golden brown. May cover the fish with a splatter guard if needed. Depending on the type of fish and your stove top, some will cook faster than others. Trout will cook quickly.
3) Remove the fish after cooking and place it on a large plate or platter. Wipe the pan with a clean paper towel and add about a tablespoon of oil to the cleaned pan.
4) Add garlic and onion. Cook for about a minute until the onion is somewhat translucent.
5) Add tomato and water. Saute about 5 minutes or until the tomato is soft.
6) Season with chicken stock powder, oyster sauce, and sugar. Stir. Add thickener. Cook about 1-2 minutes.
7) Add scallions, stir and turn off heat. Pour the contents over the fish.
8) Garnish with cilantro if interested

*My family and I love to eat cilantro and usually I add some on top to garnish if I have any in the kitchen. However, I did not add any to this since my friend does not like to eat it. The dish below was made by adding periwinkles (ocean snails)--that was delicious!

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Green Papaya and Carrot Soup (serves 4 as part of a shared meal)

I have a collection of large green papayas to eat and unfortunately I am on Maui for just over a week. Recently I made soup with half of a green papaya and it was so tasty I decided to make more and share with a few friends. Cooking the green papaya in a soup makes it taste more like a vegetable and nothing like a fruit. I would compare the taste similar to a winter melon or gourd. I used pork bones but you can use chicken or beef with bones or even oxtail. I like carrots for flavor, color and shape. However, you can be creative and add other vegetables to your pot. Be sure to choose a papaya that is still hard. I use my thumb and gently press into its flesh. If it feels firm to touch then it is good to use. If it feels springy then leave it in a paper bag to speed up the ripening process and eat it as a fruit. Be sure to check on the bag every 1-2 days for ripeness. I have forgotten to check and to no surprise found it got a little furry!

Green Papaya and Carrot Soup (serves 4 as part of a shared meal)

Ingredients:

About 2 lbs pork bones
Enough water to cover all the bones and papaya and carrot (I used about 8 cups of water)
1/2 large green papaya, peeled, cut into bite size
1 large carrot, peeled, cut into 1/4 inch rings
1 bunch scallion, cut into 1 inch lengths
Fish sauce
Salt

Method:

1) In a pot add just enough water to cover the pork bones. Gently boil the bones for about 5 minutes.
2) Remove from heat and clean the bones with cold water. Wash the pot.
3) Return the bones to the clean pot. Simmer for about 15-20 minutes uncover. Skim and discard any foam or impurities that float to the top.
4) Add carrots, cook for about 5 minutes.
5) Add papaya and cook until everything is soft enough to pierce with a fork (about another 10-15 minutes) or to your preference.
6) Add scallions and season with fish sauce and salt.

dark clouds over West Maui and sugar cane field (Maui, 2016)
new moon after sunset on Haleakala (Maui, 2016)
So have you ever wonder what's at the end of a rainbow?
Well, this is it. A clump of trees!

Banana Passion Smoothie (makes about 4 cups)

My husband and I are visiting Maui--this time to celebrate our 10th year of marriage. We rented a convertible inspired by his uncle Jan Willem and aunt Marja from Holland. They came to our wedding, rented one and loved driving all over the island including the scary part of the Hana Highway. They laughed and told us with sheer excitement that from their seats they could look down and see the steep cliffs! 

my husband in our rental Volkswagen Beetle (Maui, 2016)
Earlier my husband was walking around and picked a few ripe fruits for us. I love making smoothies when I have fresh tree ripened fruits. Here is a refreshing drink with apple bananas and passion fruits. The apple bananas are about half the size of the Williams banana (or Giant Cavendish) and are very sweet. I did not add extra sugar or sweetener to this drink. However, you may add brown sugar, honey, agave nectar or another sweetener if interested.

Banana Passion Smoothie (makes about 4 cups)

Ingredients:

5 apple bananas (or 2 Williams bananas), peel
3 passion fruits, scoop out and use the seeds and juice
6 oz or about 1/2 can of Aloha Maid Pass-O-Guava juice
About 1 cup vanilla low fat yogurt
About 6 ice cubes

Method:

Put everything in a blender and blend until smooth.

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Seared Scallops with Mushroom Coconut Sauce (serves 2-3)

With below freezing temperatures I was able to clean out my freezer. I find that winter is an ideal time for me to perform this task because I can put all of my frozen food in a bin (and of course a cover in case it snow, rain, hail or a mix of everything!) and leave it outside a day or more without having to worry about thawing or spoiling. During the cleaning I was able to discard some old food and find some good forgotten food. I was surprised that I still have a large bag of scallops left. When I come across such a find I know this cleaning ordeal is worth my effort. Here is a mushroom coconut sauce to go with my seared scallops. Eat this with pasta, noodles such as spaetzle, mashed potatoes or whatever your heart desires.

Seared Scallops with Mushroom Coconut Sauce (serves 2-3)

Ingredients:

2 1/2 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 small white onion, chopped (or about 3 Tbsp)
3 garlic cloves, chopped (or about 1 Tbsp)
1 scallion, green parts only, chopped
12 oz white button mushrooms, sliced thinly
6 oz container of coconut milk
1 1/2 Tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp Przyprawa W Plynie (Maggi liquid seasoning), optional*
16 oz Seared Sea Scallops

Method:

1) Heat a pan over medium high heat. Once the pan is hot add butter and oil.
2) Add onion, garlic and scallions. Saute for about a minute. May turn heat down slightly to avoid burning the garlic.
3) Add mushrooms and cook until everything is just wilted (about 5 minutes).
4) Add coconut milk and soy sauce. Saute for about another 2 minutes and turn heat to low. Add Przyprawa W Plynie.
5) Seasoned the scallops with a sprinkle of fine sea salt and ground white pepper. In a separate pan lightly fry each side of the scallop in a little oil over relatively high heat until golden brown (about 5-6 minutes total cooking time). Avoid overcooking.
6) Add the seared scallops back to the sauce. Serve with pasta, noodles, mashed potatoes or anything you prefer.

*Przyprawa W Plynie is Maggi liquid seasoning made by Nestle. It looks like soy sauce but it is not. I found this at a Polish store in Dorchester, Massachusetts. I bought it for experimentation because I have never seen it before. If you do not have this available you may omit it in this recipe.

Saturday, March 5, 2016

Daikon Kimchi (makes one mason jar)

--photo of day one of my kimchi jar
--the color will get slightly darker red as it is aged
--this is one of the jars that was given to me by my mother-in-law (thank you!)

daikon cubes, cut scallions, and onion wedges
There are probably many methods to making the popular Korean kimchi--spicy, fermented, seasoned vegetables. The main ingredients are vegetables, chili, salt, and anchovies or fish sauce. This style of kimchi is inspired by my grandfather, mother and aunts' way of pickling some of their vegetables. They let the vegetables dry out naturally overnight or a few hours to half day or a whole day in the sun to release some of the liquid. I find that this process gives the daikon a nice crunch. My parents think this kimchi is tasty. I will tell you this about my family. If something is not good we will say it. That's just the way we are. Some people may view this differently but I call this constructive criticism because hopefully we can really learn from the feedback and make it better the next time. If we get insulted by this then we will not improve but continue to make the same bad food that no one gets too excited to eat. If you have constant large amount of food leftover and no one seems too keen about eating it then perhaps this may be a subtle hint. My mother thinks this kimchi batch has enough saltiness. They find that after 4 days it is edible. However, I normally keep the jar refrigerated and wait 7-10 days before eating (about the length of time a typical viral upper respiratory infection or a common cold lasts for the average population).

Daikon Kimchi (makes one mason jar)

1 medium sized daikon (2 lbs), peeled and cut into approximately 3/4-inch cubed, washed
1 bunch scallions, green parts only, cut into about 1-inch lengths, washed
1/2-1/4 onion, cut into about 1/4-inch wedges, washed
1 recipe of Kimchi Sauce Mixture (recipe to follow)

Method:

1) Spread the cubed daikon on a flat surface (I used 2 plates) in a single layer, leave out at room temperature overnight to dry out (the winter air can be quite dry here in New Hampshire--which is helpful to speed up the process).
2) The next day mix about 1/4 cup of salt (I used regular salt) and about 1/2 cup of water (the salted water should taste salty) and stir until blended then pour this over the partially dried daikon cubes. Leave for about 1/2 day. Stir the contents occasionally to coat evenly. More liquid will come out of the daikon after several hours.
3) Rinse the daikon a few times with clean cold water to remove the brine. Let the daikon partially dry in a strainer.
4) Marinate the prepared daikon with scallions, onion and Kimchi Sauce Mixture. Mix all ingredients until everything is well incorporated. Let the mixture sit for about 15 minutes. Stir and then add everything including the liquid to a sterilized (I boil the clean glass jar with lid for about 5 minutes--be careful not to burn yourself when you do this) glass container. You may have to shake the container a few times and press the contents down in order to get everything to fit in the jar.
5) Refrigerate the jar at least 4-5 days before eating. Turn the jar to the side or shake it a few times about once a day to get the contents distributed evenly. Be sure to use clean utensils when removing the daikon from the jar for consumption.

kimchi sauce mixture
Kimchi Sauce Mixture

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp good fish sauce (I used Squid brand)
1 1/2 Tbsp Red Pepper Paste (I used the go-chu-jang brand)*
1 Tbsp grated ginger
1 Tbsp grated garlic
1 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp vinegar

Method:

In a small bowl mix all ingredients together until well blended. Give the sauce a taste and adjust any seasoning according to your taste.

*You can certainly add more ginger and garlic. Often time I prefer more of these 2 ingredients. Sometimes I even add sliced gingers along with the grated ginger to my jar.
*I searched but was not able to find chili powder at the store (H-Mart). That store is huge. I must have asked the wrong staff because they were not able to help. I found the Red Pepper Paste (go-chu-jang brand) instead. It turned out the paste worked well and economical. There was another paste nearby but it was twice the price. I was unclear how the more expensive version was more superior. I think the cheaper container I bought worked just fine. 

daikon kimchi (a few days after canning)
addendum: I made another batch using 2 medium sized daikons, a few carrots and double the Kimchi Sauce Mixture. This time I added a little extra salt and fish sauce to make it a little saltier than the above recipe. According to my mother she thought it could use slightly more salt. My mother tends to prefer a saltier taste than me. I used pasta jars that I have saved over the years. These jars can be recycled and make a great gift.